Menu

Marketing

Finding Joy in the Mundane

Often the monotony of everyday life can quickly extract joy. It has been said before that novelty is the key to happiness and once the novelty of an action, a person, or an event wears off, it becomes mundane and no longer satisfying. The problem is that life is full of the mundane.   Christians are called to be joyful in an unearthly way and to find joy that is beyond the norms of this world. How does one find that joy when all we do is go from home to work and back? Finding this joy stems from seeing the world through a different lense. Being in the world, but not of the world goes beyond church and witnessing to people. Seeing your daily commute as something more and looking at it as a time for learning something new or engaging with the surrounding world is a magnificent way of finding something bigger in a small moment. That conversation with your neighbor Bill about the weather? Take it to the next level. See it as your last chance to talk to Bill. Approach it as the first and last time you will ever get to see Bill. Go beyond the mundane and dive deeper. It stems into so much of our life. The idea that we need to look at things as so much more than just routine and humdrum. We must look at it as our last chance to engage, while also looking at it as our first time doing this particular task. Do you remember the first time you saw your husband and thought he was attractive? Now ten years, two career changes, and three kids into the marriage, he’s just the man that you share your life with. What would happen if you woke up each…
Read more...

McDonald’s, FA, Facebook: Everything that matters this morning

McDonald’s trials delivery service with UberEats McDonald’s is partnering with UberEats to trial on-demand delivery across London, Leeds and Nottingham. UberEats users who live within a mile and a half of certain outlets will be able to order from the McDonald’s menu for home delivery between 7am and 2am. The cost will include a £2.50 delivery fee charged by Uber. The trial, which currently spans 22 restaurants in London, seven in Nottingham and three in Leeds, will be extended if it proves successful. The UK is one of the last markets to get McDonald’s home delivery, which was launched in the US as early as 1993. It is thought the fast food giant was under pressure to keep pace with rivals Burger King and KFC; the latter announced a tie-up with on-demand delivery app Just Eat in April. READ MORE: McDonald’s launches home delivery in the UK after tie-up with Uber[1] FA ends £4m-a-year Ladbrokes deal The Football Association is ending a £4m-a-year sponsorship deal with Ladbrokes, claiming it is “inappropriate” for the organisation to have commercial relationships with betting companies. The deal ends just a year into a four-year contract and comes at the conclusion of a three-month review into the governing body’s relationship with gambling. The review also looked into sponsorship by alcohol firms, although no action is being taken in that area. The FA’s decision to cut ties with gambling also comes in the wake of accusations made by former Burnley footballer Joey Barton, who was banned from the sport for 18 months in April for illegally placing hundreds of bets on matches. At the time of his sentencing Barton blasted the FA for its “dependence on betting companies”. The decision relates only to the FA and there is no expectation individual football clubs will be asked…
Read more...

AOL’s digital prophet claims the ‘four Ps of marketing’ are ‘absolute rubbish’

Photo by Jarle NaustvikThe ‘four Ps’ are a widely-adopted framework among marketers, with the likes of Tesco CEO Dave Lewis publically supporting their integration within big business. And in a February Marketing Week poll,[1] which generated nearly 800 votes, a resounding 77% of marketers answered yes when asked if the 4Ps of marketing were relevant to their job today. However, it’s fair to say Oath[2] and AOL’s digital prophet (FYI – that’s a self-awarded title) David Shing isn’t much of a fan. Speaking at the ProcureCon Marketing conference yesterday (15 June), Shing delivered an energetic, if rambling, presentation, where he seemed to dive through a different subject every 30 seconds while rapping unverified stat-after-stat to back up his many claims. While making a point that the “wearable web” will be the next major trend for marketers, Shing claimed: “The 4 Ps of marketing are absolute rubbish. “It’s true that 37% of kids are now better at swiping on iPads than their parents. If you give them analogue they think it is broken. So what’s the use of applying the four Ps that were invented in 1948 and are now so completely of out touch?” READ MORE: The big debate: Are the ‘4Ps of marketing’ still relevant?[3] Shing was also critical of celebrity influencers and brand advocates. He believes consumers are now more influenced by their peers than a celebrity influencer network. The latter, he says, is “starting to backfire” because it’s too superficial. However, just a few minutes earlier he had praised influencers, advising the audience: “If you can find a videographer, a DJ or an influencer you can make them part of your brand. You need to give them the tools to create stuff. The life of your content must start, not die, when it’s published and they can…
Read more...

International round-up: Facebook tackles ‘Live’ suicide videos, Twitter lands in hot water

Facebook tackles ‘Live’ suicide and murder videos Facebook has not had an easy ride with its ‘Live’ offering. A string of disturbing videos have surfaced on the social network over recent weeks, including a Cleveland man’s murder, a teenager who accidentally shot himself while broadcasting on Instagram Live Stories and the killing of an 11-month-old girl in Thailand. As a result, Facebook is hiring 3,000 more people for its community operations team, which reviews sensitive material to keep violence, hate speech and child exploitation off the platform. The move brings the division up to 7,500 employees. “Over the last few weeks, we’ve seen people hurting themselves and others on Facebook—either live or in video posted later,” CEO Mark Zuckerberg wrote. “It’s heartbreaking, and I’ve been reflecting on how we can do better for our community. “If we’re going to build a safe community, we need to respond quickly. We’re working to make these videos easier to report so we can take the right action sooner—whether that’s responding quickly when someone needs help or taking a post down.” READ MORE: Facebook Is Hiring 3,000 People to Help Prevent Suicide and Murder Videos From Being Shared[1] Digital accounts for almost half of ad spend in Australia Almost half of all ad spend in Australia now goes on digital channels, new research shows. Digital accounted for 48.6% of all advertising spend in 2016, up from 42.5% the year before, according to the Commercial Economic Advisory Service of Australia. TV spend dropped from 24% to 21.6% of total ad spend in 2016 according to the report, however, ThinkTV has recently reported a shift to digital formats, noting that video on demand spend increased 48% year on year. Mobile advertising, a subset of the digital advertising spend, increased to 15% of the whole paid media…
Read more...

Amazon’s Twitch on why brands should see it as the ‘Gogglebox of live streaming’

Twitch links up its most popular influencers to promote brands such as DuracellWhen Amazon splashed out $970m (£585m)[1] to acquire Twitch back in August 2014 more than a few eyebrows were raised. Twitch, which also comes in app form, is an online platform that allows gamers to watch live streams of other gamers playing games. It works by connecting directly to their Xbox, PlayStation[2] or mobile gaming platforms and recording the action live. A good idea, sure, but not something that necessarily screams out major mainstream success. However, the numbers, along with the subsequent rise of eSports[3] and mass live streaming integration within the likes of Facebook and Twitter, would suggest Amazon saw the right kind of potential. Twitch has grown to more than 100 million users, with 9.7 million using it daily and 2 million broadcasting live videos every month. The average amount of time an active Twitch user spends on the platform daily is one hour and 46 minutes, while in 2016 users watched 292 billion minutes of Twitch streams. The next chapter for Twitch is to establish itself as an advertising channel. Over the last year, it has started working with the likes of Nike, Apple, Netflix and Kellogg’s. For the latter, Twitch says it successfully pitched “storyboards like an agency,” selling the concept of a 30-second pre-roll ad for the Krave cereal brand, which utilised one of Twitch’s most famous gaming influencers. And Twitch’s VP of sales for Europe Steve Ford says this work is only just the beginning. He tells Marketing Week: “When I introduce Twitch to new advertisers, I tell them 10 years ago if I had told you the most enjoyable TV show would be one about watching other people watching TV shows, you would say I was bonkers. Yet here we are.…
Read more...

Mark Ritson: Learn from Hollywood and re-work your biggest hits

I spent all last week working with a global beauty brand that is going through a significant revitalisation under a new CMO. The brand is question continues to do well in the market but it’s slowing down and the new CMO has spent the last year renewing, refocusing and recharging almost every element of the brand and its business. New positioning, new visual merchandising, new staff training, new brand tracking. You name it and she is upgrading it. The only thing that isn’t being upgraded is the SKU (stock keeping unit) count. Like many companies, my client has managed to gradually breed a gigantic army of different products, sizes and variants and the final tally now crosses the four-figure mark – and counting. When my CMO put up her killer slide showing that 2% of the SKUs are delivering almost half the company’s sales there were audible gasps from the country teams attending the meeting. It’s worth pondering just how this brand got to this point. The story might be familiar. Over the last two decades the company in question has been highly agile and innovative and launched many new serums and creams into the market. But alongside that bright white spark of new innovation there should have been the dark shadow of product deletion. Brands that create should also kill. But like all too many companies my client wanted the thrill of new products and the reassurance of maintaining the existing portfolio. Play that approach out by 15 or 20 years and you have an overstocked portfolio that is confusing beauty associates, customers and marketers alike. The fix is coming of course. My CMO has a three-year plan to get the SKU count down to a more profitable and focused number. The other key to her product strategy is…
Read more...
Subscribe to this RSS feed